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Category Archives: Permanent Residence

Welcoming Parents and Grandparents to Canada through PGP 2021

Canada has announced the Parents and Grandparents program through which Canadians and Permanent Residents can sponsor their parents and grandparents to become permanent residents of Canada.

IRCC (Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada) expects to draw 30,000 people from the lottery over the course of two weeks. The IRCC Web site only takes into consideration individuals who filed an interest for sponsorship form between midsummer EDT on 13 October 2020 and midday EDT on 3 November 2020.

An IRCC directive stated, to avoid utilizing outdated forms or following previous instructions, IRCC advises candidates to wait until they get an ITA before filling out an application. Those who apply but do not receive an ITA will not be repaid their application fees.

Application process for parents and grandparents program

Upon receiving the ITA, – the applicant needs to complete two applications that include-

  • Application for Request of sponsorship
  • Parents’ and grandparents’ application for permanent residency

These two requests can be submitted simultaneously online. The applicant needs to pay an application fee, biometric fee and other fees. The application fees can be paid online that include the following payments such as-

  • Sponsor processing fees, which means fees for the sponsored people and their employees
  • Entitlement to permanent residence fee

The applicant shall also pay the biometric fee charged on filing the application. However, after the application is filed, biometrics is collected. The applicant may also need to pay fees to third parties for carrying out Medical examination and issuing of Police Certificate.

The family members may be asked to provide their biometrics through a letter after paying the biometric fees. The family members are given 30 days to provide biometrics at the nearest collection point. In addition, pursuant to COVID-19, IRCC has put in place particular arrangements or measures for biometrics collecting.

IRCC provides a period of 60 days to receive completed sponsorship applications from invited sponsors. Sponsored parents and grandparents will become permanent residents of Canada and as such would be eligible for all benefits, including free health care.

There exists a high demand among Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor their loved ones and receiving a PGP invitation is tough. Previously, IRCC has received about 100,000 website visits displaying interest for submitting sponsor forms within minutes of the policy being launched.

If I receive a PGP 2021 invitation, what should I do?

It is critical that you meet the eligibility requirements for the PGP 2021. The following conditions must be fulfilled to meet the PGP eligibility criterion:

  • You must be at least 18 years old, a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, or a member of a status First Nations.
  • You must also show that you have the Minimum Necessary Income to IRCC (MNI). Your notifications of assessment from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) for the tax years 2020, 2019, and 2018 must be submitted.

In case you fit the criteria and want to move further, you will have 60 days to submit your complete sponsorship application to IRCC, with the necessary payment. PGP is emerging as an opportunity to reunite families as part of family reunification program assisting applicants on humanitarian grounds.

Individuals who live in Quebec and who want to sponsor a parent or grandparent need to have their income assessed by the Quebec Immigration Ministry, which is based on the province’s income standards.

How Can X Immigration can assist you?

If you have been invited to sponsor, please contact us it would be our privilege to paly a part in reuniting families.

To help you with your PGP 2021 application, we will –  

  • Our experienced RCIC consultants will provide free consultation and help you understand the PGP program
  • We will answer all queries from you (sponsor) and the applicant (parents and grandparents)
  • Verify that you meet the PGP 2021 eligibility requirements
  • Gather all required paperwork, supporting documents and fill out necessary application forms
  • Submit your application to IRCC within the 60-day period
  • Keep you informed about the status of your application
  • Communicate with Canadian government on your behalf

Canada launches 2 new immigration pathways for Hongkongers

The Canadian government has opened two new pathways to permanent residence for Hong Kong recent graduates and workers living in Canada as part of an initiative initially launched in February. There are two streams under new program. Over the years Canada has become a second home for many Hong Kong residents after their families moved to cities like Vancouver and Toronto.

Stream A will allow Hong Kong residents who have graduated from a Canadian post-secondary institution in the past three years to apply for Canadian Permanent residency. Stream B targets Hong Kong residents who have completed post-secondary studies in Canada or abroad within the past five years and have worked in Canada for at least one year in the past three years.

Stream A (In Canada Graduates)

To be eligible for Stream A, the applicants must have completed a post-secondary education from a Canadian Designated Learning Institution in the last three years. They must have done at least half of their program in Canada, either in person or online. Eligible diploma programs must be at least two years in length. Graduate or post-graduate credentials must be at least one year in length, with the previous credential earned no more than five years before the start of the program.

Applicant must have completed one of the following at a post-secondary designated learning institution in Canada in the last 3 years:

  • degree (bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or doctorate)
  • diploma from a program that is at least 2 years in length.
  • graduate or post-graduate credential (for a diploma or certificate) from a program that is at least 1 year in length; in addition, 50% of the program must be completed in Canada.
  • If an applicant has a graduate or post-graduate diploma or certificate, they must have completed a post-secondary diploma or degree as a prerequisite to this education, in the 5 years before starting graduate or post-graduate program.

Stream B: Canadian Work Experience

This stream is for applicants who have at least one year of full-time work experience, or 1,560 hours of part time work experience in Canada within the last three years. During this period applicant must be allowed to work legally in Canada on a valid work permit or should be exempted.

Applicants cannot include hours of work they performed as a full-time student, self-employed person, unemployed, work on job leaves (maternity, paternity, or similar), or work outside Canada.

Applicant must also have completed one of the following at a post-secondary DLI in Canada in the last 5 years:

  • degree (bachelor’s degree, master’s degree, or doctorate)
  • diploma from a program that is at least 2 years in length.
  • graduate or post-graduate credential (for a diploma or certificate) from a program that is at least 1 year in length; in addition, the program must require a post-secondary degree or diploma, which must have been earned no more than 5 years before starting the graduate or post-graduate program.
  • ECA report for international qualification equivalent to a Canadian post-secondary diploma (for a program of at least 2 years), a Canadian post-secondary degree, or a Canadian graduate or post-graduate diploma or certificate (for a program of at least 1 year).
  • If an applicant has a graduate or post-graduate diploma or certificate, they must have completed a post-secondary diploma or degree as a prerequisite to this education, in the 5 years before starting graduate or post-graduate program.

Under the employment section, applicants need to demonstrate a copy of the T4 tax information slips, notices of assessment issued by Canada Revenue Agency, copies of records of employment, pay stubs, copies of bank deposits showing salary payments, and a letter from your employer.

Other Requirements for both Stream A and B

All applicants must fill the following visa and supporting application forms:

Generic Application Form for Canada [IMM 0008]

Schedule A – Background/Declaration [IMM 5669]

Additional Family Information [IMM 5406]

Supplementary Information – Your Travels [IMM 5562]

Document checklist [IMM 0134]

Additional Dependents/Declaration [IMM 0008 DEP]

Use of a Representative [IMM 5476]

Applicants need to hold a valid passport issued by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China or by the United Kingdom to a British National (Overseas) from Hong Kong.

Applicants must intend to live in any Canadian province or territory other than Quebec.

Applicants are subjected to Canada’s regular immigration application, screening processes and admissibility requirements.

Applicants must be physically present and have valid temporary resident status in Canada at the time they submit their application and when their permanent residency status is granted.

Applicants must have CLB 5 in all 4 skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) in either English or French.

Canada believes that this policy will strengthen Canada’s international ties and provide skilled Hongkongers with a unique opportunity to develop their careers in turn helping to accelerate post pandemic recovery for the country.

Experienced immigration professionals at Can X can help you make Canada your new home. We can prepare and submit your application in compliance with IRCC standards. If you wish to prepare and submit your application by yourself, but are unsure about rules, regulations, and completeness of application, you can avail our file review services. We will professionally review the application, supporting documentation and offer you a chance to ask any queries.

Contact us for free consultation and assessment!

The Impact of Processing Delays on Canadian Businesses

Canada is facing a growing skilled labor crunch and industries are struggling to find qualified workers. The increased processing times of immigration pathways is a problem that is closing doors to new growth and leaving employers open to risk.

According to a survey conducted by The Canadian Employee Relocation Council (CERC), “Unless addressed, increasing processing times are likely to have a negative impact on business operations within the next year.”

A total of 26 organizations that rely on access to international talent to meet talent needs and fill skills gaps were surveyed. Participating organizations were from technology, manufacturing, government /health care/ education, natural resources, and construction/engineering services. 44 % of participating organizations report using economic immigration programs to access temporary residence workers.

Primarily, 74% of participating companies used Express Entry and CUSMA professional pathways to hire foreign nationals while 67% used PNP immigration pathways. All participating organizations agreed to the importance of international talent to their businesses, while 70% strongly agreed to their contributions.

In the survey, as an impact of processing impediments 83 % of organizations stated that canceled and or delayed projects are the most common consequence of the delays, almost two-thirds expect the delays to result in lost revenues and 30% stated they had to face penalties for not meeting contractual obligations. The unprecedented labor shortage is forcing organizations to hire ill-suited candidates, resulting in foregone opportunities that impede businesses’ ability to compete.

This lack of skilled labor and halt in the international mobility of temporary foreign workers is increasing the labor market gap, businesses are facing a labor shortage and the demand for skills across many sectors is on the rise. The survey sheds light on global talent access via immigration and international mobility programs, the top three skills accessed are 93% of skilled workers, 85 % executive management, and 67 % engineering staff. Nonetheless, the demand for non-degreed professionals and technical staff is growing, though the lack of education makes it difficult to access their talent.

The survey also highlighted that apart from ongoing challenges faced by IRCC, the continued closure of Consulates, High Commissions and VAC abroad has had a great impact as temporary foreign workers cannot complete biometrics in their home country.

With a dearth of new talent pools and retiring workforce, Canada should take actions to expedite processing of applications. The survey questioned respondents if they would pay an additional fee for expedited processing of applications and 89% of respondents said they would be willing to pay between 10% and 25% above current processing fees for expedited processing as for Skilled labor shortage has become the most pressing need of their organizations.

Coming Soon: More permanent residency pathways for temporary residents in Canada

Canada may offer more permanent residence pathways to temporary residents (e.g. international students, temporary foreign workers, and asylum seekers) who are currently in the country.

In 2020, COVID-19 pandemic has turned the tables around the world, may it be developed, developing or underdeveloped economies. Every country is having a hard time keeping their economies afloat, given travel restrictions and disruption in supply chains globally.

The Coronavirus pandemic is affecting birth rates worldwide and high-income countries like Canada are expected to see declining fertility rates, resulting in a smaller population size and rapidly increased greying of Canada. Canada has been feasting on immigrants for years as they compensate for the negative economic and fiscal impact created by the aging population and decline in birth rates. This will have a strong impact on the labor market and to ensure long-term economic recovery, the federal and provincial governments need to keep immigration ️as a priority to support this decline.

COVID-19 has impacted pre-determined immigration level targets of Canada, both permanent and temporary residents have dropped significantly, along with this unemployment is prevalent and the economy is falling. To support the economy and to meet the necessary labor market needs in terms of workforce availability, Canada needs immigrants as their impact on Canadian economy is profound.

Helping temporary residents become permanent residents will address Canada’s needs to respond to COVID-19 and will benefit Canada in the long term because candidates who already have Canadian experience tend to have strong labor market outcomes. Temporary residents like international students and temporary foreign workers already possess Canadian work experience, have already settled in, and have high English or French language ability, which leads to quicker labor market integration, solving economic and labor market needs.

Canada reaffirms their ongoing commitment towards immigration especially international students and global talent as Canada continues to count online study at DLI towards eligibility for PGWP between May 2020 to April 2021. During the tenure of post-graduation work permit, international students gain necessary Canadian work experience to qualify for permanent residency through economic immigration programs.

Immigrant-focused financial recovery plans should be at the forefront of Canada’s post-pandemic goals to offset the temporary decline in immigration and to ensure long term recovery.

What makes Canada a great destination for immigrants?

10th largest economy in the world

Canada is a thriving country that claims the 10th largest GDP worldwide, fueled in part by its vast natural resources, significant industrial base, tourist attraction, and vibrant seafood industry. According to Statistics Canada, Canada’s economy is extremely service-oriented, with 78.9% of Canadians working in a service-related job, though it is perceived that Canada is growing due to its natural resources. Though the manufacturing sector is relatively small in comparison to the service sector, it is the cornerstone of Canadian economy, with 68% of its exports constituting merchandise exports.

World-class education system

Canada tops the list as the most educated country in the world. According to the OECD over 56 percent of adults in the Great White North have earned some education after high school. Canada’s high academic standards and rigorous quality controls assure that you will be earning a high-quality education that will open doors for your future and benefit your career over the long term. A Canadian degree, diploma or certificate is globally recognized as being equivalent to those obtained from the United States or Commonwealth countries.

The quality of education and living standards in Canada are amongst the highest in the world, but the cost of living and tuition fees for international students are generally lower than in other countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom. Under Canada’s highly dynamic and hands-on academic environment, you will not only acquire knowledge and skills in analysis and communication, but you will also learn how to express yourself, demonstrate your creativity, and develop your self-confidence.

Canada has world’s top universities, such as McGill University, the University of Toronto, McMaster University, and the University of British Columbia which rank among the world’s top 100 academia.

Booming tech industry

Canada’s evolution over the years as a fount of technology is mirrored by the growth of the Tech sector. Toronto and other parts of Canada have been feasting on tech talent as immigrants are diverting from the U.S. due to stringent immigration policies like temporary suspension of H1B1 Visa which facilitated immigration for thousands of skilled immigrant workers every year. Even during coronavirus outbreak, immigrants in the U.S. faced unusual threat to employment, where in the U.S. is closing doors for immigrants while Canada is attracting an impressive flow of technology jobs and investment.

Tech companies with global footprint are setting up hubs and expanding operations in Canada. The number of tech jobs in Toronto has risen steeply with an increase of 54% from about 148,000 to 228,000 in the past since 2013. Canada certainly displays compelling potential with its mix of talent, technology, and universities together with highly skilled immigrants possessing STEM degrees even before arrival into the country.

Vancouver and Calgary are booming towards clean tech innovation, while Montreal has established itself as a hub for innovation in Artificial Intelligence and game development. Overall, Canada is attempting to attract highly skilled foreign professionals through visa programs like the Global Talent Stream with fast processing time where you move to Canada as quickly as a month as well as provincial tech programs that offer an expedited immigration pathway for people with tech skills .

Multiculturalism and immigration supportive

Over several decades, multiculturalism has evolved from a humanitarian approach to an official policy which became a defining part of Canada’s national identity. Canadian Prime minister Justin Trudeau government’s mantra is “diversity is our strength” which depicts the characteristic Canadian willingness to include various ethnic groups towards the cultural enrichment of Canada.

Canada has been accepting more immigrants per capita than any other developed Western countries. Particularly 310,000 new permanent residents were welcomed by Canada in 2018 and further it is expected that Canada will welcome nearly one million immigrants over the next three years.

In Canada, multiculturalism has always been a form of integration where people respect the diversity of languages, religions, and cultures. Multiculturalism exists when people accept and encourage many cultures to thrive in a society which can be seen particularly in major cities like Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal. Toronto is one of the most multicultural cities in modern history and this is because of a unique mix of various dominant groups like the British, Irish, Indian, Chinese, Italian and smaller groups like the Dutch, Japanese and Romanians.

Most inclusive country in the world

Canadians have always prided themselves as being open and inclusive. According to Ipsos recently released research, Canada ranks 1st among 25 countries on inclusiveness. Canada stood 2nd on LGBTQ Inclusiveness Score after France as the country has strong support for the LGBTQ community which is evident as Canada became the 4th nation worldwide to legalize same-sex marriage and the first nation outside of Europe in 2015.

Canada actively promotes inclusion and respect for diversity at home and abroad. Establishing equality is a top challenge that the entire human society is facing at the moment, but Canada seems to manage this challenge efficiently in social, economic, cultural, and civic inclusion. In Canada it is apparent that women have a strong voice, along with this basic women’s rights such as voting, birth control access and abortion are long-established and safeguarded in the country.

Universal health-care system

Canada’s health care system has prominent features that distinguish it from virtually all other high-income countries providing universal health care coverage. Firstly, healthcare in Canada is delivered through the provincial and territorial systems called Medicare, which is publicly funded. Canada has one of the world’s highest life expectancy rates and stands at 18th position in the world for life expectancy.

Canadian citizens have the second highest quality of life in the world, according to The World Economic Forum ranking, which ranks countries by quality of life using criteria like access to medical care, sanitation, and shelter, as well as education, life expectancy, and personal freedoms.

Employee entitlements

Canada is exceptional as “provincial law governs annual paid leave, unless the employee falls under federal jurisdiction.” All provinces guarantee two weeks paid vacation, except for three weeks in Saskatchewan. Along with this the employees receive statutory holidays depending on the province.  Canadians also have secured access to a variety of monetary protections including Employment Insurance (EI), old age security, the Canadian Pension Plan (CPP), and a federal childcare benefit.

The minimum wage in Canada ranges from $11 to $15 among different provinces and it stands among one of the highest in the world.  Canadian workers also have access to new family-friendly benefits and progressive workplace policies that allow up to 18 months of parental leave, with the mother and father able to share the leave however they choose.

Beautiful and safe place

The landscapes of Canada range from arctic tundra and BC’s snow-capped mountains, to beautifully desolate prairies and PEI’s rugged coastlines along with interesting architecture in Montreal’s historic buildings. From coast to coast to coast, the country is home to vibrant and culturally rich cities, along with incredible natural wonders.

According to the Global Peace Index of 2018, Canada was ranked the 6th most peaceful nation in the world. Be it protection of citizens on the streets, guarding them against misconduct, or even shielding them against online crime, Canada has done it all. Canada is also known for their strong gun control as they have a comparatively peaceful approach to foreign diplomacy.

Stable democratic political system

The Economist ranked Canada as third-most democratic nation according to its Democracy Index in the year 2006. Canada’s political system is a parliamentary democracy, with its own social and political institutions. Though Canadian governments shift between various liberal and conservative parties depending on the political climate; there is no moral shift as core values and ideologies like women’s and LGBT rights, environmental concerns, and immigration, are shared by the political parties.